Home Water Myths Exposed Is Your Water Safe? Filtered vs Bottled Eco-Friendly Water Water Filter Comparison Where to Buy?
WFC Facebook Page
FAQs Links News
LEAD

Lead is a soft, malleable poor metal, also considered to be one of the heavy metals. Lead has a bluish-white color when freshly cut, but tarnishes to a dull grayish color when exposed to air. It has a shiny chrome-silver luster when melted into a liquid. Lead is used in building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets and shot, weights, and is part of solder, pewter, fusible alloys and radiation shields. Lead has the highest atomic number of all stable elements, although the next element, bismuth, has a half-life so long (longer than the estimated age of the universe) it can be considered stable. Like mercury, another heavy metal, lead is a potent neurotoxin that accumulates in soft tissues and bone over time. Lead poisoning was documented in ancient Rome, Greece, and China.

Lead poisoning (also known as plumbism, colica pictonium, saturnism, Devon colic, or painter's colic) is a medical condition caused by increased levels of the heavy metal lead in the body. Lead interferes with a variety of body processes and is toxic to many organs and tissues including the heart, bones, intestines, kidneys, and reproductive and nervous systems. It interferes with the development of the nervous system and is therefore particularly toxic to children, causing potentially permanent learning and behavior disorders. Symptoms include abdominal pain, headache, anemia, irritability, and in severe cases seizures, coma, and death.

Routes of exposure to lead include air, water, soil, food, and consumer products. Occupational exposure is a common cause of lead poisoning in adults. One of the largest threats to children is lead paint that exists in many homes, especially older ones; thus children in older housing with chipping paint are at greater risk. Even an item as small as a paint chip can contain tens to hundreds of milligrams of lead, presenting a serious risk if ingested. Prevention of lead exposure can range from individual efforts (e.g. removing lead-containing items such as piping or blinds from the home) to nationwide policies (e.g. laws that ban lead in products or reduce allowable levels in water or soil).

Regular activated carbon water filters will remove low levels of lead from tap water but cannot handle higher levels. A reverse osmosis system should be used to purify water with high levels of lead.

* Some info courtesy of Wikipedia.

BACK TO WATER CONTAMINANTS

Why do You Need a Water Filter?

Because your body is a "natural" water filter. The human body collects, processes, and filters contaminants on a daily basis from the food, water and air that we consume. If you drink water with high levels of pollutants, your body then becomes a living filter of sorts. It will remove many contaminants on its own but whatever it cannot remove will be left behind to be absorbed or deposited in your tissues and organs. Over time, the accumulation of toxic contaminants could overwhelm your body's natural defenses leading to serious disease, cancer and death..

It is easy to replace a bad cartridge with a new one when a water filter fails. It is much harder to replace any valuable organs when the human body fails.

Don't use your body as the filter!

Home FAQs Links News
COPYRIGHT 2010 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Water Myths Exposed Is Your Water Safe? Filtered vs Bottled Eco-Friendly Filters Water Filter Comparison Where to Buy?